Posts Tagged ‘Beck’s Cajun’

Got King Cake? Get Your Mardi Gras On!

February 14, 2017

 

bill-with-king-cake

Order King Cake from Beck’s Cajun Café.

If you have been lucky enough to experience Mardi Gras in person, you’ve probably yelled, “Throw me some beads!” and enjoyed catching lots of treasure.   During this flamboyant, loud and fun-filled carnival atmosphere, one tradition that appeals to all ages: an extravagant and gaudy, multi-colored purple, green and gold dessert called King Cake.

The colors that make up the King Cake include purple for justice; green for faith and gold for power.

If you’ve never had a slice of King Cake, and are lucky enough to have the trinket in your slice of cake, you probably are wondering why is there a baby in your cake?   Tradition dictates the use of a small trinket, usually, a small plastic baby (representing the baby Jesus) which traditionally awards privileges and brings good fortune to whoever discovers it – in the past, it was made of porcelain or even gold.  It also brings obligations including hosting the next King Cake Party.

Quickly place your order for King Cake by calling Beck’s Cajun Café at the Reading Terminal Market (215) 592-0505 or the 30th Street Station (215) 282-2800.  (more…)

Advertisements

Mardi Gras King Cake Party @ Reading Terminal Market!

January 20, 2016

 

mardi-gras

Mardi Gras comes early this year at the Reading Terminal Market. Join two-time James Beard guest chef Bill Beck for a King Cake party on Sun., Feb. 7, 2016 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Sample classic Nawlins’ dishes, participate in a king cake decorating contest and meet Philadelphia’s Marilyn Russell, host of Mornings with Marilyn on 95.7 BEN-FM and Tony Luke Jr., cheese steak magnate and host of Food Mashups. A $5 donation is requested to support MANNA.

“Let the good times roll with us right here in the Reading Terminal Market,” said chef Beck. “It’s a great way to kick-of Mardi Gras and support an organization that nourishes people’s bodies and spirits.”

The event will kick-off with a cooking demonstration in the market’s City Kitchen. Chef Bill will prepare traditional items such as oyster bisque and smoked collards with ham hocks and Tabasco. He will also introduce new creations like Eggs St. Rita, a take on eggs Benedict with grilled corn bread, shrimp and andouille scrapple, spinach and Creole Hollandaise.

A celebrity judged king-cake decorating contest follows at 12:30. Donors to MANNA will pair off to create their own masterpiece using a special “mystery” kit. Marilyn Russell, Tony Luke Jr., blogger Kass of Philly Food Girl and Jeff Belonger of MyPhillyAlive.com will number among the judges.

Beck’s Cajun Café has become known for King Cakes in recent years, providing the sweet and colorful pastry for Mardi Gras. The cake named for the biblical story of the three kings, is a ring of braided brioche topped with icing and sugar in purple, green and gold, representing justice, faith and power.

The cake usually contains a small plastic baby, said to represent the Baby Jesus. Tradition holds that the person who gets the piece of cake with the trinket is traditionally awarded various privileges and obligations including hosting the next king cake party. Those wanting to order a King Cake are encouraged to call Beck’s Cajun Café at 215-592-0505 or 215-382-2800.

Beck’s Cajun Cafe is known for its exotic and spicy Creole cuisine made with ingredients from the Big Easy. With locations at Philadelphia’s historic Reading Terminal Market and Amtrak’s 30th Street Station, Beck’s offers authentic dishes including gumbos, jambalaya, muffaletta and bread pudding. Beck’s is the home of the Train Wreck, a culinary creation where po boy meets cheese steak with a name the pays homage to the reading terminal markets train shed history.

Find more about Beck’s Cajun Café at:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BecksCajunCafe
Twitter: https://twitter.com/BecksCajunCafe
Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/s/beck’s%20cajun%20cafe
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/search/pins/?q=beck%27s+cajun+cafe

Reveillon Recipe — Daube Glacee

December 11, 2012

daube glaceeRéveillon (“awakening”) is a dinner held on the evenings preceding Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. It is so named because participants stay awake well past midnight. The tradition is still observed in New Orleans. Try Daube Glacee (Terrene of Beef Shortribs), courtesy of Chef John Besh, with a twist from Beck’s.

Ingredients:

• Four pounds boneless beef short ribs, cut into 2-inch cubes
• Beck’s Devil Dust
• One-quarter cup sugar
• Salt
• Freshly ground black pepper
• One Quarter cup canola oil
• Two large onions, diced
• One stalk celery, diced
• Three cloves garlic, minced
• One carrot, peeled and diced
• Two cups red wine
• Two bay leaves
• One cup canned chopped tomatoes
• Two cups Basic Veal Stock
• Two ounces dried mushrooms, softened in warm water and minced
• Leaves from 3 sprigs fresh thyme
• One envelope gelatin
• Pickles

Method:

Season the short ribs with the Beck’s Devil Dust, sugar, salt, and pepper. Heat the canola oil in a large heavy pot over high heat. Add the meat; several pieces at a time, taking care not to crowd the pot, as crowding will prevent the meat from browning. Turn the meat often, carefully allowing each piece to brown before transferring it from the pot to a platter.

When all the beef has browned and has been removed from the pot, add the onions, celery, garlic, and carrots. Stirring constantly, allow the vegetables to cook until the onions become mahogany in color, about 20 minutesReturn the beef to the pot. Then add the wine, bay leaves, tomatoes, Veal Stock, mushrooms, and thyme. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to low, cover, and cook until the beef is fork tender, about 2 hours.

Once the beef is cooked, remove from the stove, discard the bay leaves, and skim off any fat floating on the surface. Season the daube with salt and pepper. If serving the daube hot, serve it over rice, pasta, or potatoes.

To serve the daube as a cold terrine, soften the unflavored gelatin in 2 TBSP cold water in a small bowl, then stir into the hot daube. Let cool to room temperature, then refrigerate in the pot, as it is traditionally done, or transfer the stew to a terrine and refrigerate overnight or until cold and set.

Serves 8 to 10 people.

World’s Biggest Train Wreck Sandwich

June 20, 2012

We set the record yesterday–making our biggest train wreck ever, a 6 foot long sub of Best of Philly sandwich heaven.

We started with a gigantic loaf of hoagie bread…

Then we sauteed steak meat with caramelized onions, salami and andouille sausage and topped it all with American cheese.  While that was cooking up to a delicious blend of spicy goodness, we slathered a healthy dose of our Creole Mayo on the bread. 

And finally, we filled the bread with the steak mixture, closed it up and sliced it up for all to enjoy. And no, there was not a piece left.

Missed it? Come on into Beck’s for a regular sized version of this Best of Philly winning sandwich!

Beck’s Rollin’ on the River

May 22, 2012

What a great time we had at the Stotes Regatta last week!

We catered the entire weekend for the BCC team (Bethesda Chevy Chase) and it was a blast.

The theme of the weekend was a “Cajun Tailgate” and we had it covered!  The crew team and their families enjoyed an assortment of po’boys:   grilled vegetable; blackened chicken; even a black angus burger po’boy.

They also had chicken corn chowder and spicy Cajun Caesar Salad.  And for the traditionalists on the riverbanks, we offered hot dogs, potato salad, fruit salad, and all the fixin’s for an all-American tailgate picnic.

We love doing offsite catering!  If you have a party or special event call Chef Bill at 215 592 0505, he’ll knock your socks off .

Beck’s Garden District Salad

March 23, 2012

 Image

At La Cucina’s “Girls Night Out” Cajun Cooking Class, Chef Bill Beck shared his tricks of the trade

The Garden District in New Orleans is world famous as an example of Southern architecture.

The District earned its name because of the mansions built in this spot for the wealthy plantation owners: their supersized houses initially featured glorious oversized gardens.

As the City grew during the late 1800s, a number of the owners of these spectacular mansions sold off parcels of their land and smaller Victorian houses were built on the site of these former gardens.

Today, the Garden District is a unique melting pot of architectural styles, characterized by “a mélange of high styles gleaned from not just the Spanish and French, but also from the Italians, the British, and the “Greek Revival.” (for further info, see About.com’s insightful overview on the District’s lineage.)

The food emanating from New Orleans reflects the varied influences that shape and define this unique city – which is what makes the New Orleans cuisine so attractive.

In tribute to this heritage, Chef Bill Beck of Beck’s Cajun Cafe rolled out his Garden District Salad at a recent cooking class held at La Cucina in Reading Terminal Market.  The classes, designated as a “Girls’ Night Out,” focused on Cajun cooking with Chef Bill demonstrating a series of New Orleans small plates, including this Garden District Salad.

The salad is colorful and evocative of sunshine-laden days spent in New Orleans….

Ingredients

(This salad serves 4 people.  Scale up quantities dependent on the size of your dinner party!)

1x jar of marinated artichokes

4 stems of hearts of palm, cut into 1/2 inch rounds

1 red pepper roasted and skin removed, then cut into strips.

Spring mix salad greens

For the vinaigrette dressing

(The recipe below produces approximately 14 oz of dressing.  As the recipe includes raw egg we would not recommend storing the dressing for any length of time.  Use immediately.  If you would like to omit the egg then the dressing will keep for longer, perhaps 2-3 days, in the fridge.

2 tsps of Dijon mustardbsps olive oil

3 cloves of garlic minced

1 egg white

6oz of virgin olive oil

4oz of vegetable oil

2 tbsps of finely minced cloves

2-3 tbsps of water

1 1/2 tbsps of honey

Juice of a lemon

1 1/2 oz Apple Cider

1 1/2 oz Champagne Cider

Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

1. Mix first three ingredients together in a bowl.

2. Slowly add the two types of oil to this mix. Add approx 2oz at a time (Note the virgin olive oil provides a strong flavor.  To balance this out and ensure that the salad is not overwhelmed, Chef Bill prefers to use vegetable oil in tandem with the virgin oil.)

3. Add chives, water – to thin the dressing slightly – and the honey.

4. Add the juice of the lemon and then add the two vinegars a little at a time — to stretch out the dressing.

5. Season with salt and pepper.

6. Toss Spring mix salad in dressing, then add in other prepared salad ingredients (artichokes, pepper, hearts of palm.)

The resulting salad has great texture and crunch.  Enjoy!

Summer Sazerac Cooler

March 23, 2012

Sazeracs are a traditional New Orleans cocktail, and this version is oh-so-refreshing as the temperatures outside rise.

These Summer Sazerac Coolers were a huge hit at Chef Bill’s Cajun Cooking Class Girls Night Out last week in La Cucina at the Market. 

The class sold out early, so if you missed your chance to attend, you can make your own Sazerac.  Chef Bill was kind enough to share his recipe….

                          Summer Sazerac Cooler

6 ea Sugar Cubes

¾. Tsp Peychaud’s Bitters

½ Tsp Angostura Bitters

2 ea Lemon Peel, no pith 1.5 inches long

2 ea Orange Peel, no pith 1.5 inches long

1.5 oz Vieux Carre Absinthe

3 oz Bulleit Rye Whiskey

3 oz Club Soda

5oz Lemon/Lime Sparkling Water

2 oz Coke

2 cups Ice Cubes

Method:

1.) Muddle in a large pitcher, the sugar cubes and both bitters till well combined and somewhat melted.

2.) Add citrus peel and muddle slightly to bruise, so as to let out the oils.

3.) Add ice to pitcher followed by the liquor and stir well to dissolve the sugar and combine the rest of the flavors.

4.) Add the flavored sparkling water followed by the coke and club soda stir gently to combine. Enjoy

Beck’s Crawfish Boil, Don’t Miss It!

March 16, 2012

Run, don’t walk, to Beck’s Cajun Cafe this weekend for their Crawfish Boil!

The Radiators, one of New Orleans favorite bands, say it best: “Suck the head, Squeeze the tip.”  They’re talking about eating crawfish, of course.

Never tried fresh crawfish?  You don’t know what you’re missing!  Head to Beck’s Cajun Cafe  this weekend for a traditional Crawfish boil!  Chef Bill will be combining the season’s freshest crawfish shipped directly from the Gulf, with corn, potatoes, a healthy dousing of Yuengling beer, and a signature blend of his spice rubs to create a giant pot of Cajun heaven.

See you there!

Flower Show Specials at Beck’s Cajun Cafe

February 28, 2012

This week’s specials honor  the Philadelphia Flower Show, and will be on the menu through March 11.  Don’t miss Chef Beck’s nod to the big event!

Chicken Salad and Oyster Poboy–this old Country Club classic gets an updated Cajun twist with the addition of Beck’s Creole Mayo.  We served this as a bite sized appetizer at the Valentine to the Market Gala and it was such a hit we decided to keep it on the menu through the Flower show.

Garden Poboy–This vegetarian poboy honors gardens everywhere.  We use a traditional poboy roll, and fill it with portobello mushrooms, roasted peppers, grilled onions and cheese.

Fried Oysters and Chicken Salad at the Reading Terminal Gala

February 25, 2012

We hope to see everyone at the Valentine to the Market Gala tonight!  This is a great party featuring live music, lots of entertainment, plentiful bars, and best of all, food catered by the Reading Terminal Market Merchants.  In case you’re a last minute type, you can  purchase tickets here or even at the door.

We’re all set to go with our Valentine appetizer–a Cajun twist on a Philly Classic:   fried oysters with chicken salad.  It is a valentine party, after all, and you know what they say about oysters…

In case you won’t be there tonight to sample these beauties,  here’s how we make them:

Coat Oysters in  flour seasoned with salt and pepper, then dip in egg and roll in panko.

Fry them in heated oil (peanut, canola, vegetable are fine, avoid olive oil).   Turn oysters til crispy on both sides and fully cooked through.

Drain briefly on paper towels.

Top with a scoop of your favorite chicken salad, a dab of Creole Mayo, and a snip of chive.

Enjoy.